Blue Bus – London reading November 18th

Letters-To-Myself-by-Nina-Zivancevic-webThe Blue Bus is pleased to present a reading by Nina Zivancevic, Giles Goodland and David Miller on Tuesday 18th November from 7.30 at The Lamb (in the upstairs room), 94 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London WC1. This is the ninety-fifth event in THE BLUE BUS series. Admissions: £5 / £3 (concessions).

Nina Zivancevic was born in former Yugoslavia but most of her life she has lived on both sides of the Atlantic where she has performed widely throughout the U.S. and Europe. She has 20 books of poetry and fiction published and her work has been widely translated. A former assistant to Allen Ginsberg, she has also worked for many years with renowned theatre companies such as The Living Theatre and La Mama in New York. Her poetry readings and solo performances draw breath from such working experiences. She lives in Paris and teaches Avantgarde Theatre at la Sorbonne. Most recently she has obtained Bourse de Creation, a distinguished poetry grant from French Centre nationale du Livre. Nina Zivancevic will present her new book LETTERS TO MYSELF published by Barncott Press in 2014.

David Miller was born in Melbourne (Australia) in 1950, and has lived in London since 1972. His more recent publications include The Waters of Marah (Shearsman Books, 2005), The Dorothy and Benno Stories (Reality Street Editions, 2005), In the Shop of Nothing: New and Selected Poems (Harbor Mountain Press, 2007) and Black, Grey and White: A Book of Visual Sonnets (Veer Books, 2011). He has compiled British Poetry Magazines 1914-2000: A History and Bibliography of ‘Little Magazines’ (with Richard Price, The British Library / Oak Knoll Press, 2006) and edited The Lariat and Other Writings by Jaime de Angulo (Counterpoint, 2009) and The Alchemist’s Mind: a book of narrative prose by poets (Reality Street, 2012). Spiritual Letters (Series 1-5) appeared from Chax Press in 2011, and a double CD recording of David Miller reading this same work came out from LARYNX in 2012. He is also a musician and a member of the Frog Peak Music collective. His Collected Poems, Reassembling Still, was published by Shearsman Books in 2014. His A River Flowing Beside will appear from Hawkhaven Press in 2014 and Spiritual Letters (Series 6) from Like This Press in 2015.

Giles Goodland was born in Taunton, was educated at the universities of Wales and California, took a D. Phil at Oxford, has published a several books of poetry including A Spy in the House of Years (Leviathan, 2001), Capital (Salt, 2006), What the Things Sang (Shearsman, 2009), Gloss (Knives Forks and Spoons Press, 2011) and The Dumb Messengers (Salt, 2012). He works in Oxford as a lexicographer and lives in West London. In 2010, he won the 2010 Cardiff International Poetry Competition. He also writes academic papers on lexicography and on Shakespeare.

Share

Reading @ Writers Union, 24 Oct + Cultural Centre Belgrade, 29 Oct, Serbia.

Nina-Zivancevic

I will be giving two poetry readings in Belgrade following the publication of my Selected Poetry in Serbian by my Serbian publishers Povelja (editor Dejan Aleksic). The readings will be accompanied by my own musical performance (I will be bringing my violin). Repertoire: John Cage, David Tudor, Haendel, Glück.

October 24: The Writers’ Union, Francuska 7 in Belgrade at Noon. My work will be presented and discussed by a panel: Alexander Petrov, Jelena Novakovic, Aleksandar Jerkov, Vladimir Kopicl.

October 29:  The Cultural Center of Belgrade, Belgrade, 7pm.

Share

Lima Journal – International Poetry Festival 2013 (Lima, Peru)

114 poets from around the world attended the 2nd International Poetry Festival 4th- 7th July in Lima Peru.

International-Poetry-Festiv

LIMA JOURNAL 2013

In Lima I have some friends, at least an old friend from New York, a Sri Lankan poet/diplomat who has waited for me with impatience—we hadn’t seen one another for 20 years! I survived flight transfers at different airports; and with a certain pomp, after some 19 hours of travelling from Madrid arrived in Lima at 5 am. The airport (a real American one!) contained long lines waiting for passport and immigration control. Suddenly I had a taste of the deserted, abandoned regions of North America—even here the people were imitating the worst modes of behavior and administration rules. I was standing now in one of these immigration queues again; and out of boredom, I wrote the following sonnet about the destiny of a human being, or “gua” as the Indios would call it:

Letter from a GUA

I am just a Gua
While I am moving and breathing
from Trujillo to Lima, I see a python,
I see a flower, I see the pain of the last
Inca emperor dying of lice and scorbutic in Lima
I will never sit down
I will never sit down
Because the meaning of ‘Gua’ is the-one-who-never-sits –down
When I sit down I die
I am here, after all, to understand
How we can preserve the forest
And the Gua who belongs to the forest..

The immigrations officer has given me exactly what I asked for—permission to stay for ten days, stamped in my passport. He did not exaggerate with his generosity, but I did not ask him for more, as I figured this would give me enough time to read and to write a couple of poems, as I am Gua, a human being constantly on the move…

My Peruvian friends and fellow-poets waited for me at Lima airport. It was their winter season, a cold July morning in Lima, so the organiser of the festival tried to accommodate the three of us quickly. The taxi driver waved in a Columbian lady poet, her elderly Swedish husband, and myself. The organiser’s overwhelming concern for our well-being was lingering in the air — I am not able to describe their concern for our “gua”, which largely went beyond the normal concern of any ordinary poetry festival organiser. I became aware of an uncanny and imminent danger wafting about, a sentiment suggested to me by certain friends, and which some of them even spelled out in detail before my departure from Paris, as they had lived or travelled extensively in Latin America.

Human life has very little value here, and it is even less valued than “in some parts of Africa”, they would tell me and then say: “Take good care of yourself, Nina, don’t ever leave the hotel alone, do not even go to buy cigarettes in Lima unless you are accompanied.” But who am I to figure out this huge country on my own? I am aware of all the prejudice against Latin America which has been dominant in Europe for centuries.

Continue reading

Share

‘Living On Air’ Reading on Resonance FM Radio (UK)

This is the archive of a recent broadcast on Resonance FM (UK). It features ‘sound-scaping’ by the ‘Band of Holy Joy‘ with Nina Zivancevic reading live from her novel ‘Living On Air’ published recently as an ebook by Barncott Press (a print edition will be available later this summer). The sound track is mixed and recorded live, with live improvised piano by Zoran Petkovic.

Share

Inauguration of the Beat Hotel in Paris (poetry reading)

Above: The Beat Hotel Plaque Unveiling, 9 Rue Git-Le-Coeur, Paris. 1 July 20, 2009. Jean-Jacques Lebel unveils a commemorative plaque to mark the site of the famous Beat Hotel in Paris. Site of the completion of William Burroughs’ Naked Lunch and where he wrote many other books including The Soft Machine, plus where his and Brion Gysin’s cut-up method was discovered and developed and where Gysin’s Dream Machine took shape. Gregory Corso wrote Bomb, Allen Ginsberg started Kaddish.

Below: Nina Zivancevic reading her poem ‘I looked at the sun and it was almost gold’ at the inauguration of the Beat Hotel, Paris July 20.

Share